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Jul. 28th, 2010 @ 12:22 pm Aussie/beagle mix
I just adopted an 8 month old aussie/beagle mix.  She's already 30 pounds and is really energetic. She tries to eat everything and hates her crate. she'll hold her bowels over night but wont give us a signal during the day to let her out. instead she goes next to the cat box. any suggestions on this and on how to get her to stop biting and jumping when we get home?
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alice1031:
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From:one_raido
Date:July 28th, 2010 05:30 pm (UTC)
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One thing to do when you get home is to not make a big fuss over her. I don't even talk to my dogs when I come into the house from being gone. They are there to greet me, but it's a very calm entrance. No dancing around. I go in, put my things down, grab the leashes an they stand there letting me get organized without a lot of dancing around. The sooner I can do this, the sooner they can go out and I thinkthey understand this.

You're in for it with the energy. Walk, walk, walk. Keep the walks under control, too.
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From:(Anonymous)
Date:August 7th, 2010 01:15 am (UTC)
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Hello, I own what is most likely an Australian Shepherd/Australian cattle dog mix (the cattle dog part is for sure) and a straight cattle dog. Both came to us as adults and jumped and nipped quite hard. A simple push to the ribs (I don't mean hit the dog at all, test on your ribs to see what is firm enough to get your attention but does not hurt), coupled with a sharp "EH" usually will get a jumping/nipping dog to sit and listen to you (some people will put a knee up, but that does not stop more excitable breeds and may be too harsh for gentle breeds). Reward the dog when it sits, and they usually soon get the picture if you are absolutely consistent in giving corrections for the jumping and nipping, followed by rewards when they are sitting or calm. Teaching dogs to sit, lie down, stay, and "place" (ie. making them lay calmly on a dog bed) will all aid this process. Pet a calm dog, get a calm dog. :)
In the case of our hardest nipper (our cattle dog), we have also taught her to "get her toy", which she will now do automatically instead of nipping us in the house when she is feeling playful and bitey. So, in one case we use a simple correction for an undesired behavior while reinforcing a desired behavior, and in another case we are merely redirecting our cattle dog's nipping to a toy instead.
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From:(Anonymous)
Date:September 13th, 2010 04:34 am (UTC)
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Just get treats and settle her down by doing a little training before bed. She should calm down. Don't forget excercise is the key.
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